Die Welt

Die Welt - Right Center Bias - Republican - Conservative - Credible - ReliableFactual Reporting: High - Credible - Reliable


RIGHT-CENTER BIAS

These media sources are slight to moderately conservative in bias. They often publish factual information that utilizes loaded words (wording that attempts to influence an audience by appealing to emotion or stereotypes) to favor conservative causes. These sources are generally trustworthy for information but may require further investigation. See all Right-Center sources.

  • Overall, we rate Die Welt right-center biased based on story selection that slightly favors the right. We also rate them High for factual reporting due to proper sourcing and a clean fact-check record.

Detailed Report

Bias Rating: RIGHT-CENTER
Factual Reporting: HIGH
Country: Germany
Press Freedom Rating: MOSTLY FREE
Media Type: Newspaper
Traffic/Popularity: High Traffic
MBFC Credibility Rating: HIGH CREDIBILITY

History

Founded in 1946 by the British Forces, Die Welt (“The World”) is a daily newspaper based in Berlin, Germany. It has a Sunday edition called Welt am Sonntag. In 2015, Die Welt restructured through a merger with TV channel N24 and became a multimedia news company.

Die Welt focuses on news, politics, sports, entertainment, business, and technology and publishes in-depth interviews with politicians and articles on investigative reporting. Currently, its editor-in-chief is Dagmar Rosenfeld.

Read our profile on Germany’s media and government.

Funded by / Ownership

Die Welt is owned by Axel Springer SE, which owns numerous publications, including Bild, Business Insider, and Fakt. Revenue is derived through subscriptions and advertisements. Financial annual reports of Axel Springer can be found here.

Analysis / Bias

In review, Die Welt publishes articles with emotionally loaded language, such as “New York Times” explains the German exception.” The report states, “How does Germany succeed? Experts give five reasons – one has to do with Angela Merkel.” Die Welt also publishes articles with a critical tone about German center-left SPD co-leader Norbert Walter-Borjans, and his tax policy: “(Calculate) with Norbert Walter-Borjans.”  On the issues, they report with balance, representing all sides. For example, this story on immigration says only the facts from surveys conducted in Germany regarding immigration: The majority of Germans think there is too much immigration.

When it comes to sourcing, Die Welt often hyperlinks to itself and to credible sources such as the New York Times and sources to lesser-known but high factual sites such as de.statista and world population review. When covering world news about the USA, they cover the Trump administration with a critical tone, such as in this article, “US President Donald Trump claims he’s ‘not a racist’ after the controversial remark.”

Failed Fact Checks

  • None in the Last 5 years.

Overall, we rate Die Welt right-center biased based on story selection that slightly favors the right. We also rate them High for factual reporting due to proper sourcing and a clean fact-check record. (M. Huitsing 5/19/2020) Updated (07/20/2022)

Source: https://www.welt.de/

Last Updated on July 20, 2022 by Media Bias Fact Check

Left vs. Right Bias: How we rate the bias of media sources