El Nuevo Dia

El Nuevo Dia - Least Biased - Not Liberal - Not Conservative or Right - Left - CredibleFactual Reporting: High - Credible - Reliable


LEAST BIASED

These sources have minimal bias and use very few loaded words (wording that attempts to influence an audience by using an appeal to emotion or stereotypes).  The reporting is factual and usually sourced.  These are the most credible media sources. See all Least Biased Sources.

  • Overall, we rate El Nuevo Dia Least Biased based on editorial positions that moderately favor the left on social issues while at the same time holding right-leaning views regarding statehood nationalism. We also rate them High for factual reporting due to reasonable sourcing and a clean fact-check record.

Detailed Report

Bias Rating: LEAST BIASED
Factual Reporting: HIGH
Country: Puerto Rico/USA
Press Freedom Rank: MOSTLY FREE
Media Type: Newspaper
Traffic/Popularity: High Traffic
MBFC Credibility Rating: HIGH CREDIBILITY

History

Founded in 1909 as “El Diario de Puerto Rico,” El Nuevo Dia is a tabloid newspaper based in Puerto Rico. Guillermo V. Cintrón, Eugenio Astol, and Nemesio Canales are the paper’s founders. In 1945, Luis A. Ferré acquired the newspaper, and later his son, Antonio Ferré Bacallao, became the newspaper owner. Elnuevodia focuses on news, politics, sports, entertainment, business, and technology. Currently, María Luisa Ferré Rangel is the editor.

Read our profile on the United States government and media.

Funded by / Ownership

The owner and publisher of El Nuevo Dia is the Ferre family through Grupo Ferré-Rangel (GFR Media). Their business model is based on subscriptions and advertisements. 

Analysis / Bias

Puerto Rico is an unincorporated territory of The United States. The BBC describes Puerto Rico as “Neither a state nor independent.” The head of government is the Governor, and The Chief of State is the President of the United States (Currently Democrat Joe Biden). Puerto Rico has two powerful political parties along with a few smaller parties. These are The Popular Democratic Party (PPD) (pro-Commonwealth/center left views similar to Democrats) and The New Progressive Party (PNP) (pro-statehood similar to Republicans ). On July 24, 2019, Governor Ricardo Rosselló (New Progressive Party) resigned due to the leaked group chat scandal known as chatgate

According to an ipsnews article, El Nuevo Dia is a member of The Inter American Press Association (IAPA) with a quote from the article that reads “El Nuevo Día is a member of the Inter American Press Association (IAPA), an organization that has frequently been accused of right-wing bias and political activism.” Further, Luis A. Ferré, who was the owner of El Nuevo Dia, was also the founder of the New Progressive Party.

In review, El Nuevo Dia publishes articles with minimally emotionally loaded language such as these: “Leaked chat between Puerto Rico’s governor and his executive team shakes the island” and “A cry for statehood.”

Further, they also publish tabloid-style articles such as “Residents of a Dominican community catch a crocodile and sacrifice it.” When it comes to sourcing, often El Nuevo Dia hyperlinks to itself as well as to some domestic sources, which we do not know the credibility status, such as sertelnoticias and credible sources such as the Associated Press. When covering world news pertaining to the USA, they cover the Trump administration with a critical tone, such as in this article, “Another rebuff to the island.”

Editorially, more op-eds favor left-leaning positions such as these:

Failed Fact Checks

  • None in the Last 5 years

Overall, we rate El Nuevo Dia Least Biased based on editorial positions that moderately favor the left on social issues while at the same time holding right-leaning views regarding statehood nationalism. We also rate them High for factual reporting due to reasonable sourcing and a clean fact-check record. (M. Huitsing 9/18/2019) Updated (09/28/2022)

Source: https://www.elnuevodia.com/english/

Last Updated on September 28, 2022 by Media Bias Fact Check

Left vs. Right Bias: How we rate the bias of media sources