WorldHealth.net

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WorldHealth.Net - Conspiracy - Fake News - Bias - Not CredibleWorldHealth.Net - Pseudoscience - Fake News - Bias - Not Credible

Factual Reporting: Low - Not Credible - Not Reliable - Fake News - Bias


CONSPIRACY-PSEUDOSCIENCE

Sources in the Conspiracy-Pseudoscience category may publish unverifiable information that is not always supported by evidence. These sources may be untrustworthy for credible/verifiable information, therefore fact checking and further investigation is recommended on a per article basis when obtaining information from these sources. See all Conspiracy-Pseudoscience sources.

  • Overall, WorldHealth.Net is a Quackery level Pseudoscience website based on the promotion of dangerous alternative health information that is unproven and in many cases debunked.

Detailed Report

Factual Reporting: LOW
Country: USA
World Press Freedom Rank: USA 45/180

History

WorldHealth.net is a website associated with the American Academy of Anti-Aging, Preventative, and Regenerative Medicine, which is a nonprofit organization, established in 1992 by Founding Doctors Ronald Klatz and Robert Goldman. According to their about page “A4M is dedicated to the advancement of technology to detect, prevent, and treat aging-related disease and to promote research into methods to retard and optimize the human aging process. The A4M is also dedicated to educating physicians, scientists, and members of the public on biomedical sciences, breaking technologies, and anti-aging issues.”

The mission of WorldHealth.net is to “disseminate information concerning innovative science and research as well as treatment modalities designed to prolong the human lifespan.” However, the website also frequently publishes alternative health pseudoscience.

Read our profile on United States government and media.

Funded by / Ownership

WorldHealth.Net is owned by the American Academy of Anti-Aging, Preventative, and Regenerative Medicine. Revenue is derived through advertising.

Analysis / Bias

In review, WorldHealth.Net claims to cover news about anti-aging, health, and medicine, however, most articles are focused on alternative health and promote pseudoscience. For example, WorldHeath.Net has been publishing frequent articles that detail questionable alternative ways to prevent or cure Covid-19, such as the use of herbs. They have also made false claims such as this: “Researchers investigated viral interference due to receiving the flu shot; in other words, does the flu vaccine make a recipient more susceptible to other non-influenza respiratory viral infections? The study’s conclusions state “Vaccine derived virus interference was significantly associated with coronavirus and human metapneumovirus.” Numerous credible fact-checkers have debunked this claim, here and here.

Like other pseudoscience websites, they make outrageous claims regarding cures for cancer such as this Vitamin C linked to cancer cure. This story is not sourced. They also promote anti-vaccination propaganda such as this Why Use Vaccine for HPV When Green Tea Works? This is sourced to alternative medicine quack, Joseph Mercola. Finally, WordHealth.Net does not support the consensus of science regarding GMO safety such as this Is There A Link Between GMOs And WiFi Technology? and they frequently promote 5G conspiracy theories that have been debunked.

Overall, WorldHealth.Net is a Quackery level Pseudoscience website based on the promotion of dangerous alternative health information that is unproven and in many cases debunked. (D. Van Zandt 4/15/2020)

Source: https://www.worldhealth.net/

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