Darien Times

Darien Times - Least Biased - CredibleFactual Reporting: High - Credible - Reliable


LEAST BIASED

These sources have minimal bias and use very few loaded words (wording that attempts to influence an audience by using an appeal to emotion or stereotypes).  The reporting is factual and usually sourced.  These are the most credible media sources. See all Least Biased Sources.

  • Overall, the Darien Times is Least Biased based on balanced content and High for factual reporting.

Detailed Report

Bias Rating: LEAST BIASED
Factual Reporting: HIGH
Country: USA
Press Freedom Rating: MOSTLY FREE
Media Type: Newspaper
Traffic/Popularity: Minimal Traffic
MBFC Credibility Rating: HIGH CREDIBILITY

History

The Darien Times is a weekly newspaper from Darien, Connecticut, distributed on Thursdays. The paper covers Darien news, politics, sports, schools, and feature stories and publishes a monthly section on arts and entertainment.

Read our profile on the USA government’s influence on media.

Funded by / Ownership

Darien Times is owned by Hearst Communications, which owns newspapers, magazines, television channels, and television stations, including the San Francisco Chronicle, the Houston Chronicle, and Esquire. According to Open Secrets, Hearst donated 70% to Republican candidates and causes in 2020. Revenue is derived through advertising.

Analysis / Bias

In review, the Darien Times focuses on local news of Darien, CT, and the surrounding area through the use of journalists. They don’t report on national or international news. All information is sourced correctly, either through linking or quotations.

Editorially, there is a reasonable balance between left-center and right-center viewpoints.

Failed Fact Checks

Overall, the Darien Times is Least Biased based on balanced content and High for factual reporting. (D. Van Zandt 9/9/2017) Updated (08/21/2022)

Source: http://www.darientimes.com/

Last Updated on August 21, 2022 by Media Bias Fact Check

Left vs. Right Bias: How we rate the bias of media sources