Weston A. Price Foundation

Has this Media Source failed a fact check?  LET US KNOW HERE.

Share:

Weston A. Price - Pseudoscience - Fake News - Anti-Vaxx Bias - Not CredibleFactual Reporting: Low - Not Credible - Not Reliable - Fake News - Bias


CONSPIRACY-PSEUDOSCIENCE

Sources in the Conspiracy-Pseudoscience category may publish unverifiable information that is not always supported by evidence. These sources may be untrustworthy for credible/verifiable information, therefore fact checking and further investigation is recommended on a per article basis when obtaining information from these sources. See all Conspiracy-Pseudoscience sources.

  • Overall, we rate the Weston A. Price Foundation a quackery level pseudoscience source based on the promotion of anti-vaccination propaganda and dangerous alternative nutrition.

Detailed Report

Factual Reporting: LOW
Country: USA
World Press Freedom Rank: USA 45/180

History

Founded in 1999, the Weston A. Price Foundation is a nonprofit organization that promotes alternative health, nutrition, and pseudoscience. According to their about page “The Foundation is dedicated to restoring nutrient-dense foods to the human diet through education, research, and activism.” You can view the staff here.

Read our profile on United States government and media.

Funded by / Ownership

The Weston A. Price Foundation is a nonprofit that is funded through donations and grants.

Analysis / Bias

In review, the Weston A. Price Foundation advocates for alternative health. The website publishes podcasts and most news and information comes from their quarterly journal Wise Traditions in Food, Farming and the Healing Arts.

The journal publishes articles with moderately emotional wording such as this: How Impersonal Vaccine Laws Play Out in Real Life: New York’s Repeal of the Religious Exemption. They also frequently promote pseudosciences such as anti-vaccine propaganda Help Prevent Mandatory Coronavirus Vaccination and Tracking!, and anti-GMO propaganda Why are GMOs Bad For Us? They have also advocated for drinking unpasteurized milk, which “according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), from 1993 through 2012, there were 127 outbreaks linked to raw milk or raw milk products like ice cream, soft cheese, or yogurt. They resulted in 1,909 illnesses and 144 hospitalizations.” In general, this is a quackery level pseudoscience website.

Failed Fact Checks

Overall, we rate the Weston A. Price Foundation a quackery level pseudoscience source based on the promotion of anti-vaccination propaganda and dangerous alternative nutrition. (D. Van Zandt 6/27/2020)

Source: https://www.westonaprice.org/

Media Bias Fact Check LogoProtecting you from fake news sites since 2015

[the_ad id="86448"]