La Nacion (Argentina)

La Nacion Argentina - Right-Center Bias - Conservative - Credible - ReliableFactual Reporting: High - Credible - Reliable


RIGHT-CENTER BIAS

These media sources are slight to moderately conservative in bias. They often publish factual information that utilizes loaded words (wording that attempts to influence an audience by appeals to emotion or stereotypes) to favor conservative causes. These sources are generally trustworthy for information but may require further investigation. See all Right-Center sources.

  • Overall, we rate La Nacion (Argentina) Right-Center biased based on editorial positions that slightly favor the right. We also rate them High for factual reporting due to proper sourcing and a clean fact-check record.

Detailed Report

Bias Rating: RIGHT-CENTER
Factual Reporting: HIGH
Country: Argentina
Press Freedom Rating: MOSTLY FREE
Media Type: Newspaper
Traffic/Popularity: High Traffic

MBFC Credibility Rating: HIGH CREDIBILITY

History

Founded in 1870, La Nación is one of the major leading tabloid newspapers published in Argentina. La Nacion’s headquarter is based in Buenos Aires. Former President  Bartolomé Mitre was the founder of La Nación. La Nación’s main competitor is the Clarin newspaper. The paper primarily focuses on news and politics, entertainment, and sports. Since its inception, La Nación has promoted a conservative editorial line.

Read our profile on Argentina’s media and government.

Funded by / Ownership

The Saguier Family is the owner of La Nacion. Following the death of Bartolomé Mitre (the fifth generation of direct descendants of the founder), Fernán Saguier became the new director. Fernán Saguier is “a descendant of the newspaper’s founder and belongs to one of the largest landowner families of Argentina.” Subscriptions and advertisements are the sources of revenue.

Analysis / Bias

La Nacion is the leading conservative newspaper of Argentina and is also known as the “opposition newspaper while the Kirchners were in power, from 2003 to 2015.” The Left-leaning Cristina Fernández de Kirchner (CFK), currently serving as the Vice President, was the president from 2007 to 2015.

In review, La Nacion appears to maintain its anti-Kirchner position through publishing articles with emotional wording such as “The card up the sleeve of Kirchnerism.”  The article states, “Cristina Kirchner pretends to believe that she is the one who sets the strategic lines of the Government and blurred Alberto Fernández wants to believe that he still governs.”

However, most articles reviewed have a balanced tone, such as “The Government asked the companies and the union “good sense” to end the conflict that paralyzes the production of tires.”  This article concerns the long-running conflict between Argentina’s Single Union of Tire Workers (SUTNA) and tire manufacturing companies Bridgestone, Pirelli, and Fate. As mentioned in the article, Gabriela Cerruti serves as the official spokesperson for (Center-Left) President Alberto Angel Fernandez.

In another article reporting about right-center former president Macri “In his new book, Mauricio Macri does not confirm if he will be a candidate for president in 2023: “In Argentina, everything changes too” the body of both articles is balanced and neutral in tone.

Regarding sourcing, La Nacion reports through journalists using direct quotes and credible sources. La Nacion also relies on credible news agencies for international news, such as AFP and the Associated Press. Finally, editorially, more stories favor the right such as this A government (Center-left) against the citizenry. Generally, the news is reported factually and with a right-leaning editorial bias.

Failed Fact Checks

  • None in the Last 5 years

Overall, we rate La Nacion (Argentina) Right-Center biased based on editorial positions that slightly favor the right. We also rate them High for factual reporting due to proper sourcing and a clean fact-check record. (M. Huitsing 09/27/2022)

Source: https://www.lanacion.com.ar/

Last Updated on September 27, 2022 by Media Bias Fact Check

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