Crosscut.com

Crosscut.com - Left Center Bias - Liberal - Progressive - CredibleFactual Reporting: High - Credible - Reliable


LEFT-CENTER BIAS

These media sources have a slight to moderate liberal bias.  They often publish factual information that utilizes loaded words (wording that attempts to influence an audience by appealing to emotion or stereotypes) to favor liberal causes.  These sources are generally trustworthy for information but may require further investigation. See all Left-Center sources.

  • Overall, we rate Crosscut Left-Center Biased based on story selection and editorial positions that moderately favor the left. We also rate them High for factual reporting due to proper sourcing and a clean fact-check record.

Detailed Report

Bias Rating: LEFT-CENTER
Factual Reporting: HIGH
Country: USA
Press Freedom Rating: MOSTLY FREE
Media Type: Organization/Foundation
Traffic/Popularity: Medium Traffic
MBFC Credibility Rating: HIGH CREDIBILITY

History

Founded in 2007, Crosscut.com is a nonprofit online newspaper based in Seattle, Washington, United States. Crosscut’s purpose is to “produce journalism in the public interest.” Its content is mainly news analysis rather than breaking news.

On December 2, 2015, it was announced that KCTS-TV, a local PBS affiliate based in Seattle, would merge with Crosscut and another website to form Cascade Public Media.

Read our profile on the United States government and media.

Funded by / Ownership

Crosscut is owned by Cascade Public Media, a nonprofit that owns PBS station KCTS-TV. Revenue is derived through donations and advertising.

Analysis / Bias

In review, Crosscut publishes news and information focusing on Seattle culture and politics. News is often reported with minimal loaded words such as, ‘ It affects the entire family: Washington parents now work alongside teens in mental health recovery. This story lacks hyperlinked sourcing but uses quotes from first-person interviews. The website features a “Politics” section that favors the left with articles like these: Democrats did well in Washington in 2018. They looked even stronger in 2020; when Joe McCarthy came to Seattle and Native American drivers are more likely to be searched by Washington State Patrol.

Generally, the news is reported factually, and opinion pieces are labeled as such. However, Op-eds tend to favor the left, with a few centrist and right-center opinions added for balance.

Failed Fact Checks

  • None in the Last 5 years

Overall, we rate Crosscut Left-Center Biased based on story selection and editorial positions that moderately favor the left. We also rate them High for factual reporting due to proper sourcing and a clean fact-check record. (D. Van Zandt 3/7/2017) Updated (08/12/2022)

Source: https://crosscut.com/

Last Updated on August 12, 2022 by Media Bias Fact Check

Left vs. Right Bias: How we rate the bias of media sources