Apost.com

Last updated on July 24th, 2021 at 09:53 am

Apost.com - Conspiracy - Not Biased - Not CredibleApost.com - Pseudoscience - Not Biased - Not Credible - Health - Medical

Factual Reporting: Mixed - Not always Credible or Reliable


CONSPIRACY-PSEUDOSCIENCE

Sources in the Conspiracy-Pseudoscience category may publish unverifiable information that is not always supported by evidence. These sources may be untrustworthy for credible/verifiable information; therefore, fact-checking and further investigation is recommended on a per article basis when obtaining information from these sources. See all Conspiracy-Pseudoscience sources.

  • Overall, we rate Apost.com a strong pseudoscience website that publishes clickbait content to be shared on social media. We also rate them Mixed for factual reporting due to misleading sensationalized headlines and the publication of frequent pseudoscience articles.

Detailed Report

Bias Rating: PSEUDOSCIENCE
Factual Reporting: MIXED
Country: Germany (13/180 Press Freedom)
Media Type: Website
Traffic/Popularity: Medium Traffic
MBFC Credibility Rating: LOW CREDIBILITY

History

Founded in 2016, Apost.com publishes clickbait quizzes, stories about animals, brainteasers, DIY, health, must-reads, and videos. The website completely lacks transparency as there is no About page or information on authors or disclosure of ownership.

Read our profile on Germany’s media and government

Funded by / Ownership

The website does not openly disclose ownership; however, it is owned and published through Social Sweethearts, a German Company that generates content to be shared on social media. The company boasts over 4 billion page views per month. Apost.com generates revenue through advertising.

Analysis / Bias

In review, Apost.com publishes content with the intent of it being shared on social media. For example, they frequently publish quizzes that most are familiar with seeing on Facebook, such as this: New Research: Only 1% Of The Population Can Identify These Iconic Females. They also publish stories about Animals and videos with the intent of having them go viral on Social Media.

Politically, Apost.com does not publish political opinion content; however, they do publish voting polls such as this Do You Think Donald Trump Can Make America Great Again?

The website features a section dedicated to information and news on health. Their health content is often highly sensationalized and not sourced to credible outlets. They sometimes promote miracles cures of cancer such as this: Miracle Boy Beats Cancer And Survives Kidney Failure At Only 9-Years-Old. They also promote miracle diets such as this: Diet Miracle Cabbage Soup – Lose 14 Pounds In One Week and the miracle of prayer Broke Mom Has Only $20, Kids Pray To God For Miracle. Then They Find A Check On Their Doorstep. Although they frequently promote pseudoscience, they do offer a disclaimer on each page that reads, “Our content is created to the best of our knowledge, yet it is of general nature and cannot in any way substitute an individual consultation by your doctor. Your health is important to us.”

Overall, we rate Apost.com a strong pseudoscience website that publishes clickbait content to be shared on social media. We also rate them Mixed for factual reporting due to misleading sensationalized headlines and the publication of frequent pseudoscience articles. (D. Van Zandt 12/4/2019) Updated (7/24/2021)

Source: https://www.apost.com/

Left vs. Right Bias: How we rate the bias of media sources

NFN-Low Biased Factual News

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