Healing Oracle

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Healing Oracle - Conspiracy - Fake News - alternative health - Not CredibleHealing Oracle - Pseudoscience - Fake News - alternative health - Not Credible - GCMAF

CONSPIRACY-PSEUDOSCIENCE

Sources in the Conspiracy-Pseudoscience category may publish unverifiable information that is not always supported by evidence. These sources may be untrustworthy for credible/verifiable information, therefore fact checking and further investigation is recommended on a per article basis when obtaining information from these sources. See all Conspiracy-Pseudoscience sources.

  • Overall, Healing Oracle is a dangerous, quackery level Pseudoscience website that has been exposed as a scam to charge expensive rates for treatments that are not medically credible.

Detailed Report

Factual Reporting: VERY LOW
Country: Unknown

History

Healing Oracle completely lacks transparency as there is not an about page nor disclosure of authors or ownership. Essentially, this a quackery level pseudoscience website that publishes alternative health and wellness news. According to a domain search the domain was registered in 2010. One author does appear on the website occasionally by the name of Amanda Mary Jewell, who apparently ran a wellness clinic in Belize and claims to be a cancer researcher from the UK (she is not). We cannot verify this, however this article seems to indicate that is the case.

An bio section on Amanda Mary Jewell reads “I do have a list of qualifications, but I find them cumbersome and false. The fact I am a qualified Holistic Doctor is neither here, nor there. Medical education is entirely corrupt and something that can be used against you. I go on courses in order to learn, not to buy a badge to hide behind, or a stick to beat people with.” This website also does not offer a disclaimer that the medical opinions expressed are not backed by science.

Finally, In May 2019, Healing Oracle was banned by Facebook.

Funded by / Ownership

Healing Oracle does not disclose ownership. Revenue is derived through donations as well as selling services such as GcMAF treatments, which according to Business Insider, individuals are charged up to $25,000 at her clinic in Belize, which was never registered as a medical clinic. You can read more about GcMAF below. Business Insider further reports “that Jewell closed down the clinic earlier this year, after authorities in Belize started looking into it.  The clinic was never officially sanctioned by the Ministry of Health and so we only interviewed her once and she was told what our problem was with her ads and clinic, and she said she was leaving, A follow-up visit two days later confirmed that she had basically left overnight.”

Analysis / Bias

In review, Healing Oracle is one of the most blatant scam pseudoscience sites we have encountered and we have reviewed many. The website covers many typical themes such as anti-vaccination propaganda, miracle cancer cures and even a cure for Autism which at this point is not possible. With that said, the primary purpose of this website is to promote expensive GcMAF treatments, which stands for Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor, a protein that is produced by modification of vitamin D-binding protein. Long story short, GcMAF has been promoted as a cure for cancer, HIV, Autism and other conditions, however there isn’t any credible evidence to indicate this is the case. In other words, this source is profiting from the promotion of pseudoscience and false hope.

Overall, Healing Oracle is a dangerous, quackery level Pseudoscience website that has been exposed as a scam to charge expensive rates for treatments that are not medically credible. (D. Van Zandt 11/7/2019)

Source: https://healingoracle.ch/

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