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What is Qanon? A guide to the far-right conspiracy theory taking hold among Trump supporters

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T-shirts emblazoned with some variation of the letter Q and signs declaring “We are Q” have made appearances at recent rallies for President Donald Trump. They represent a growing number of vocal followers of a conspiracy theory, known as Qanon, that has taken hold among some Trump supporters.

The far-right theory centers around an anonymous source, Q, who is trying to tell the world about a secret battle being waged by Trump and special counsel Robert Mueller against a pedophile ring filled with celebrities and political elites. There’s no evidence to back the conspiracy theory’s preposterous claims, but somehow that hasn’t stopped Qanon from gaining an online following.

Full Story @ NBC News

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4 Comments on What is Qanon? A guide to the far-right conspiracy theory taking hold among Trump supporters

  1. Off topic, but how downsides NBC, Huffpost, and WaPo get high factual ratings when they all failed several fact checks by Check Your Fact, a n IFCN fact checker?

  2. Media Bias Fact Check // August 7, 2018 at 5:56 pm //

    I don’t see any failed facts by them on Check Your Fact. If you have them please send them to this link.

    https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/help-us-fact-check/

  3. I have sent multiple links from both the Weekly Standard and Check Your Fact concerning WaPo, HuffPost, and NBC to that link. This was before NBC’s reevaluated page came out too. IIRC, it said that NBC had never failed a fact check.

  4. Media Bias Fact Check // August 8, 2018 at 6:58 am //

    Thanks. We receive so many submissions that we are often more than one month behind. I will make sure to check them out and adjust accordingly.

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